Question: Who Vs Whom In A Question?

Who I trust or whom I trust?

1 Answer.

Strictly speaking, it should be whom, because, as you note, the pronoun is the object of trust.

In fact, however, the use of whom is essentially optional in less-formal registers of modern English, except when the pronoun is the object of a preposition and directly follows the preposition..

Who said to whom in English?

The title ‘Who said what to whom?’ really sums it up: who takes subject position and whom takes object position. But don’t get too carried away. Whom, although elegant sounding, is not always appropriate even when used correctly in the grammatical sense.

Who I recommend or whom I recommend?

The commonly repeated advice for remembering whether to use who or whom is this: If you can replace the word with he or she or another subject pronoun, use who. If you can replace it with him or her (or another object pronoun), use whom. One way to remember this trick is that both him and whom end with the letter m.

How do you use whom in a question?

If the preposition is at the end of the question, informal English uses “who” instead of “whom.” (As seen in “Who will I speak with” above.) However, if the question begins with a preposition, you will need to use “whom,” whether the sentence is formal or informal. (As in “With whom will I speak?”)

Who or whom are you waiting for?

You should use “who” for the subject of the sentence, and “whom” for the object of a verb or preposition. In this case, “whom” is the object of “waiting”. BUT “whom” sounds very stiff and formal in this sentence, and most English speakers would only use “who” in this sentence, and in most casual speech or writing.

Who I admire or whom I admire?

Obviously, the proper word is who. Compare that with He is a man who I admire. Because we would say I admire him, the sentence should read He is a man whom I admire. The key to mastering whom comes down to knowing the difference between a subject and an object.

Can whom be plural?

Whom is a pronoun that replaces the singular or plural object of a sentence. Whom can be used in a question or a statement.

Who vs which animals?

This also applies to using “who” and “whom.” If the animal has a personal relationship with the person, then use “who” or “whom.” Otherwise you must exclusively use “which” or “that.” Here’s an example that incorporates both of these rules: Personal: My horse, whom I call Steve, is my best friend.

Who vs whom in questions?

Whom should be used to refer to the object of a verb or preposition. When in doubt, try this simple trick: If you can replace the word with “he”’ or “’she,” use who. If you can replace it with “him” or “her,” use whom. Who should be used to refer to the subject of a sentence.

Who or whom should I contact?

It should be “Whom should I contact?” Whom replaces the object of the sentence. The answer to the question would be “I should contact him.” Not “I should contact he.” That’s the easiest way to be sure of whether to use who or whom. If it can be replaced with he, use who.

Is many of whom correct?

A: It should be “whom.” The clause at the end of that sentence should read “ … many of whom are held back by societal barriers.” … In this clause, the subject is “many,” and the verb is “are.”

Who vs whom sentences examples?

Use who when the subject of the sentence would normally require a subject pronoun like he or she. For example, “Who is the best in class?” If you rewrote that question as a statement, “He is the best in class.” makes sense. Use whom when a sentence needs an object pronoun like him or her.

Who vs that vs whom?

Use “who” when you refer to the subject of a clause and “whom” when you refer to the object of a clause (for information regarding subjects versus objects, please refer to Sentence Elements).

Who is example sentences?

Apparently Señor Medena had two children who denied him. How can he remember well his ignorance–which his growth requires–who has so often to use his knowledge? Jonathan glanced up at Alex, who met his gaze sternly. If he knew who Alex really was, he probably knew more than Alex did.

Who is she or who she is?

“Who is she” is correct. By using “who she is” you are actually describing a woman/girl, implying a direct opinion or stating a certain characteristic about her. By using the “who is she” is asking what is the identity of that woman/girl that you are trying to know about.

Who or whom do you live with?

3. Who I Live With or Whom I Live With? Whom I live with or with whom I live are the correct ways to phrase this. The rule is that who refers to the subject of the sentence while whom refers to object of the verb and or the preposition.

Who is VS that is?

When you are determining whether you should use who or that, keep these simple guidelines in mind: Who is always used to refer to people. That is always used when you are talking about an object. That can also be used when you are talking about a class or type of person, such as a team.

Is some of whom correct?

some of whom spoke English”? It is correct to say ‘some of whom’. Prepositions are always followed by the ‘object’ case. So, ‘of me’, ‘to him’, ‘by her’ etc; never ‘of I’, ‘to he’, ‘by she’.